Trigons

Photocourtesy of Charles Merguerien.
Photocourtesy of Charles Merguerien.

Art? A primitive map showing a mountain range? High-precision laser inscribing? Nope! Just one of the many natural beauty marks of rough diamonds. These close-ups are as beautiful as the pictures in my “Opals in October” post. I would fill my walls with large-scale reproductions of these, they are so fabulous!

Diamond_face_trigons_scale

Trigons are triangular growth patterns that appear on diamond rough. Oriented in the opposite direction of the gemstone’s octahedral face, these marks were etched into the diamonds as they formed by extremely hot fluids, far below the earth’s surface.

diam-as-rough-trigon-facet-direct-t

RoughPic copy

Quote from “The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America”

“The unwinding brings freedom, more than the world has ever granted, and to more kinds of people than ever before—freedom to go away, freedom to return, freedom to change your story, get your facts, get hired, get fired, get high, marry, divorce, go broke, begin again, start a business, have it both ways, take it to the limit, walk away from the ruins, succeed beyond your dreams and boast about it, fail abjectly and try again.”

-George Packer

The Sugarloaf

 

 

The sugarloaf manages to be both humble and bombastic, understated but magnificent, paying true homage to nature’s vivid palate. 

In light of two friends’ recent engagement, which came with a gorgeous sugarloaf ruby ring, I’m inspired to post about this special cut.

The sugarloaf, named for the form in which sugar was sold before the advent of the sugar cube, is a variation of the more common cabochon-cut. This cut was made to highlight a gemstone’s magnificent color. It does not try to disguise the natural inclusions within the stone but acts as a window into their unique beauty. (See the above picture, courtesy of 1stdibs.com, for a stunning example of a ruby.) A rough gemstone is cut into an elipse shape with a diamond-edged saw and then ground-down with diamond grit and polished to a high shine. 

The sugarloaf manages to be both humble and bombastic, understated but magnificent, paying true homage to the incredible vividness of nature’s palate. The cut is used heavily, though not exclusively, to fashion sapphires, rubies and emeralds in fine jewelry. Polished in smooth domes, words like “juicy” and “sumptuous” come to mind when I see these candy-like gems.  I always have the urge to pop them in my mouth!

See a comparison of  the cabochon and sugarloaf cuts in these two spectacular JAR, Paris rings. Though very similar, you will see that though emerald dome is high, the ruby has a slightly more squared effect and comes to a soft point at its peak.

Photo courtesy of JAR.
Photo courtesy of JAR.
Photo courtesy of JAR.
Photo courtesy of JAR.
Photo courtesy of Farone.
Photo courtesy of Farone.

 

Photo courtesy of 1stdibs.com
Photo courtesy of 1stdibs.com

 

Photo courtesy of Fred, Paris.
Photo courtesy of Fred, Paris.

 

Photo courtesy of Kara Ross.
Photo courtesy of Kara Ross.